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Thread: Just got a Scout 800 - Portland Ore.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    64

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    I removed the heater box and heater core from the engine compartment. I then cut the whole thing down into a compact unit which fits nicely under the dash. This does two things for me. It heats up the cabin faster because it is drawing air from inside the cabin. It frees up a huge amount of space under the hood. now my battery is located on the passangers side closer to the starter and up against the fire wall.



    I've done much more than just this, but these are all the photos I have to share with you right now.

    Body work is almost complete, just about ready for some paint (rattle can for now). The floor boards are almost finished.

    My last major project before I'm ready to hit the road is the single fuel tank with a rear mounted filler. How I pull that off is unknown just so you know. I'll figure something out.

    Thanks for looking.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    16

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    Looking good. That's an interesting idea with re heaterbox. I'd like to see how it turns out. I tried a similar set up with my wipers. I couldn't get the arms off the motor just right. I was either hitting the speedo or the plastic defrost box. You may not have that problem since you changed the heater set up. I went to the marine wipers. Looking forward to your progress.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    64

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    UPDATE:


    This is an image of my new filler neck.

    What's wrong w/ this picture? It's a fuel caps under the passangers side tail light!!

    What the heck has this kid done now??

    Well to be honest I never liked the 800's twin saddle tanks. Ever since the day I owned it I knew thoes tanks were going to creat some grief.

    Here in Oregon we are not allowed (by law) to pump our own fuel. I dont want to comment on the typical gas station attendant here in Oregon. They're lucky they have jobs! Usually there is one person working a station with a minimum of 8 pumps. So they normally ask how much gas you want, push the nozzle in the car, squeeze the trigger and leave.

    Cant do that in an old 800. There is nothing to catch the nozzle with. And the attendants cant sit there and hand feed 12 gallons in the tank. so I gladly fill my own tank.

    But the next problem is that the neck makes a sharp 90 degree turn and pours into the top of the tank. So when the nozzle finally realizes the tank is full, I've got gas pouring down my fenders.

    Also if I want to go for the full monte and get the full 24 gallons, I have to turn the Scout around...and when the station is full of people that aint going to happen.

    The last problem is that the old caps dont do a very good job at sealing. So once my tanks are full I get to see gas leak from them as I make corners.

    I dont like seeing my hard earned money evaporating on my paint. It's an unsafe way to throw money away!

    So I decided to ditch the two tanks in favor of a single modern tank with a modern filler neck.


    This is a JP1C tank. They are inexpensive and plentful. Found in lots of Jeep products, this is from a 76-86 Jeep CJ7, Scrambler and early Wrangler (I think).

    I went with a JP1C 15 gallon tank. Sure it's a Jeep tank. Tuff !@#%. Their cheep, plentifull and hold gas. They also fit perfectly beind the rear axle of a Scout.

    The filler neck is also Jeep.


    Here is an image of the filler neck hoses. The main neck is an awesome marine hose which can be sharply bent almost 180 degrees and it will not fold in on its self. PRODUCT INFO: ALFAGOMMA ITALY, T-600 MARINE EXHAUST/FUEL S&D 1", USCG/SAE J 1527 TYPE B2

    All went well and I think I'm really going to enjoy this new set up.


    This image is of the breather lines for my new tank. Old Scout saddle tanks have no breather, unless you count the poor sealing cap as a breather.


    OH YEAH. I'm keeping the old filler caps on the Scout. They belong there. But to keep the gas station monkeys from pouring fuel on my rear tires, I've made an inner plate, painted red, that will physically keep them from puting the nozzle there.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fasteddy46 View Post
    Looking good. That's an interesting idea with re heaterbox. I'd like to see how it turns out. I tried a similar set up with my wipers. I couldn't get the arms off the motor just right. I was either hitting the speedo or the plastic defrost box. You may not have that problem since you changed the heater set up. I went to the marine wipers. Looking forward to your progress.
    Hey Fast Eddy

    The heater box rocks. And with my new heater ducts, under the dash, I get tornado wind across my entire windshield.

    My wiper arms touch nothing but the top light bulb wire on my speedo. I'm redoing my dash anyway so I'll get a chance to nip and tuck a bit. Obviously the wooden parts in the picture have been replaced with metal. I just used wood because its quick to mock up stuff.

    I have more updates, but have not had the time. It's summer and time for work. Maybe this fall / winter I'll have more time.

    Thanks for your intrest.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    64

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    Here is a photo of the fuel tank and the rock pan. I did have to cut the Jeep rock pan down a bit, but it is the closest fit I could find.

    I would have liked to use a fuel cell, but I could not find any fuel cells that had the filler neck on the far side or top side of the cell. Almost all of them have their filler located in the center top of the tank. I couldnt come up with a clever way to use a fuel cell and maintain my ground clearance. So the Jeep tank was the only real option.



    Here is a photo of the blocking plate used on the side filler holes. This plate has not been painted red yet.

    While researching tank I visited my local Pick N Pull and they had 4 Scout 80's!!! Three of them had truck tops. I picked up two of these near perfect tops for $75 each. I'm going to use one on my 800 and I'm going to trade the other one when the time is right. The glass is perfect, no dents...only some surface rust and hornet nests, that's it!

    More photos of top repair next...cause that's what I need to do next. hahaha.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    dallas, tx
    Posts
    1

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    Thinking about doing the same thing on my 65' 80 with a 304. Worried about the double tank issue and the cost of parts for both of them. How did you get the sending unit to work? DId you use the jeep sending unit, does it work witht he original scout gas gauge and pumps.
    Just starting my rebuild, motor is being done at the moment.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    64

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    The fuel tank works like a charm. Pump fill nozzle fits right in and stays in place. Tank hold fuel!! (bonus), fuel gauge works fine.

    Here are some recient photos







    So the Body work is done. The top and doors have all new weather stripping. The motor is running great and I'm going to just enjoy it for a while before doing any more work.

    Thanks for stopping by. I'll post more when I have more to post.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    64

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbuck83 View Post
    Thinking about doing the same thing on my 65' 80 with a 304. Worried about the double tank issue and the cost of parts for both of them. How did you get the sending unit to work? DId you use the jeep sending unit, does it work witht he original scout gas gauge and pumps.
    Just starting my rebuild, motor is being done at the moment.
    Hey G Buck 83.

    OK,

    FUEL TANKS:
    SPECTRA PREMIUM - JP1C 15GAL 1978-1986 JEEP CJ7 TANK 25-1/4" X 18-1/4" X 10-7/8"

    FUEL SENDING UNIT:
    DORMAN - 692-116 OHMS 80 [E] - 10 [F] RANGE [REPLACES OE J5357373] USED IN 15 GAL TANKS.

    FUEL GAUGE:
    AUTOMETER 'Z' SERIES - 2642 OHMS 73.Ohm [E] - 8-12.Ohm [F]

    So, I used the correct sending unit for this Jeep tank. The Jeep sending units for this tank operate on a different Ohm Range than the original Scout. It was my understanding that nothing (sending unit) will work with an old Scout fuel gauge.

    Sending units and gauges need to be paired. In other words you need to know the operating range of your sending unit in order to get the corisponding gauge.

    In this case the Jeep sending unit operates between 80 - 10 Ohms. 80Ohms = Empty & 10Ohms = Full.

    I spoke with Autometer and they said that they have some gauges which operate between 73 - 8-12 Ohms. So when my sending unit reaches 73 Ohms the gauge will read empty. When teh sending unit reaches 10 Ohms the gauge will read right at full.

    Gauges and sending units are not that complex if you can find out your sending unit range and pair that with the gauge range.

    I have only run two tanks of gas through the Scout. The first tank I had not purchased a gauge yet so I was running blind. That's kind of an exciting way to travel. Wana turn your daily commute into an edge of your seat thrill ride... Unplug your fuel gauge! hahahahaha
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Hi One800,

    I joined the club last week with the purchase of a nice '70 800A SR2. You can see that it has the signature leaking filler neck paint damage. I have searched all the Binder sites and I believe you have the most thorough documentation of your one-tank solution and I'd love to use it on my rig. Have a few questions still:

    1. The plumbing on that Jeep tank is a lot more complicated than the IH saddle tank. Where do the breather lines for your tank terminate (looks like they are routed up and around the driver side end cap, but from there?)
    2. Did you use a return line from the fuel pump? The sender on this new tank looks to be set up for that but I dont know that my Scout has a return line.
    3. Did you need to reroute your exhaust pipes? Or add a heat shield? Or both?

    Beautiful rig you have there - love that green.Thanks for sharing your work!

    5I25Hd5M63Ea3K43J8ca969466b14208a10d9edit.jpg
    Last edited by MerAngler; 10-26-2012 at 03:23 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MerAngler View Post
    Hi One800,

    I joined the club last week with the purchase of a nice '70 800A SR2. You can see that it has the signature leaking filler neck paint damage. I have searched all the Binder sites and I believe you have the most thorough documentation of your one-tank solution and I'd love to use it on my rig. Have a few questions still:

    1. The plumbing on that Jeep tank is a lot more complicated than the IH saddle tank. Where do the breather lines for your tank terminate (looks like they are routed up and around the driver side end cap, but from there?)
    2. Did you use a return line from the fuel pump? The sender on this new tank looks to be set up for that but I dont know that my Scout has a return line.
    3. Did you need to reroute your exhaust pipes? Or add a heat shield? Or both?

    Beautiful rig you have there - love that green.Thanks for sharing your work!

    5I25Hd5M63Ea3K43J8ca969466b14208a10d9edit.jpg
    Hey man, thanks for the comment. Welcome to a great forum full of good folks. I'm sorry it has taken 7 months for me to reply...I just think...real...slow. Nice 800A. What are your plans? It looks really stout, great score.

    To answer your questions

    The saddle tanks on a scout have not breathers, it cant get much simpler than that.

    My breathers terminate just above the lowest edge of the rear fender. I was going to add a charcoal capture canister from a modern car...and I will some day...but right now they end just above the fender.

    OH...Is that a return line?? Well hell! I dont need to use a return line, my 345 is thirsty.

    Seriously, I didnt know that was a return line (I hooked it up to the other two breather lines), I dont think I've ever seen a return line on a vehicle that uses a mechanical fuel pump. None of my pre '75 vehicles have a return line. I'm glad you pointed that out though.

    The exhaust was dumping out before my rear tires. That was not the sound or style I wanted, but it did the trick temporarily. Now my exhaust is routed between the passengers side frame and the fuel tank. I did build a heat shield for the portion of pipe that runs the length of the tank. That exhaust pipe gets really hot, so the heat shield is a must in my opinion.

    The green paint is Ace Hardware rattle can Hunter Green Gloss #17087 - Rust Stop. If you were to see the paint up close you'd not want to touch it for fear of getting warts or what ever frogs skin has on it. I love the color too. Paired with the appliance freezer white it looks really clean...even when its a bit dirty.

    Thanks for all the positive feedback. More photos to come. There is still much to do.
    Last edited by ONE800; 05-20-2013 at 03:39 PM.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

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